Your Questions About Solar Panel Calculator

Ken asks…

Is my calculator broken?

My calculator won't turn on. I haven't used it for about a 5 or 6 days or so and I kept it in a pencil case so the solar panels couldn't get any light. Could it be that the battery is uncharged? If so how do I charge it?

ssadmin answers:

Try…

Changing the battery.

Leaving out the calculator for a few days.

Also, you can't charge a calculator, unless it's like in a phone or like a fancy one where you use a charger to charge it. Otherwise, you can't do it. All you have to do is buy a new one!!! You can't buy one at like $5 or maybe a bit more or less!!! Unless it is a fancy one… In Staples, they have great coupon deals that you can use to buy a really fancy one for $79 or something. In Walmart or Target, they are probably real cheap, being a department store, like $50 or less.

Lizzie asks…

The Sanchez household is about to install solar panels to reduce the cost of heating their house. ?

In order to know how much the solar panels help, they record their consumption of natural gas before the panels are installed. Gas consumption is higher in cold weather, so the relationship between outside temperature and gas consumption is important. Here are data for 12 consecutive months:
Degree days193300081127463834
Gas used3221.610.70.71.63.15.17.776.1
Use your calculator or software: the correlation between degree days and overall gas usd is about     
(Use decimal notation. Give your answer to three decimal places.)

What are the values that a correlation r can possibly take?

ssadmin answers:

Move this question to mathematics in homework help, and you should get your answer.

Mark asks…

I may have found a basic flaw in solar energy. Any thoughts?

Hi Folks,

It is just that I have recently purchased solar units, made into panels, to do some measurements.

Just out of being inquisitive.

These are OK for a football feild of panels on an orbiting comms. satellite or similar, but all it takes is a cloudy day here on the surface, and the show packs up.

Oh, I have low-powered devices up and running an a good day, such as a calculator, FM radio, flashing LED's, tiny fan, a wich that will haul a few paper-clips up and down from an upstairs window, but that's about it.

Pretty hopeless.

I can get between 12VDC at 200 mA, or 1.5 VDC at 1.5 A.

So, to power up this “energy efficient” light bulb above me, I would need a shoe-box full of re-chargeable Nicad batteries, about 500 + little solar panels to return a feeble one mains light at night.

This arrangement would have an equipment cost of about £300, which is what it would be on the mains to run a titchy bedside bulb for 10000hrs, or about 14 months.
For one low energy domestic light bulb

The whole lighting here would be £1000's in cost for the panels, I need a football pitch, and forget TV's, vacumn cleaners, fan ovens etc, etc.
So the mains wins every time.

Sure I could clad the roof with panels, but I will be dead before it breaks even !

Any notions ?

Bob

ssadmin answers:

I salute your accomplishment; not many have had the patience and persistence to build up their own panel from individual cells. You would make a good counterpoint to those sites like earth4energy that imply one can build a panel for less than $200 and power the entire house with it.

If I'm reading right, you're getting maybe 2 to 2.5 watts from your setup. The max power point may be somewhere in between those two voltages you measured, but that's a technical discussion for another time.

The cost, if £1 = $1.50, was $450. For a little less than $350, you can get the 120-watt panel here http://sunelec.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=5&products_id=245 . For a residential install, you would typically get larger panels, possibly at a better price per watt.

Your estimate of £1000's for a rooftop system is right, but for that kind of money, our array managed to supply our entire electrical needs (6500 kWh/yr), including an electric stove and oven, washer/dryer, refrigerator, and other appliances. We have no air conditioning, and heat is from natural gas, including the dryer. And we're in California, possibly a sunnier location than you. We paid $12k net, but the same system today would be more like $10k.

Susan asks…

Help Solve math equations!!!!?

1) Factor each polynomial. Write the GCF outside of the parenthesis and the remaining factors of each term in the parenthesis. If the polynomial cannot be factored, write the GCF as 1 and rewrite the polynomial inside the parenthesis. Use the ^ key to denote power. Example 3+2c^3

5b + 9b3 =

2)Factor each polynomial. Write the GCF outside of the parenthesis and the remaining factors of each term in the parenthesis. If the polynomial cannot be factored, write the GCF as 1 and rewrite the polynomial inside the parenthesis. Do not put spaces in your answer.

-18y^3 – 7y^2 =

3)What if . . . ? The area of the solar panel on another calculator is (2×2 + 4x) cm2. Factor this polynomial to find the possible expressions for the dimensions of the solar panel.

Possible expressions for the dimensions of the solar panel are_______cm and ________cm

4) Factor each expression.

4s(s + 6) – 5(s + 6)

5)Factor each polynomial by grouping.

6b3 + 8b2 + 9b + 12

6)Factor each polynomial.

15×2 – 10×3 + 8x – 12 answer= -1( )( )

7)Factor each polynomial. Write the GCF outside of the parenthesis and the remaining factors of each term in the parenthesis. If the polynomial cannot be factored, write the GCF as 1 and rewrite the polynomial inside the parenthesis.

x2 + 5x =

8)Factor each polynomial. Write the GCF outside of the parenthesis and the remaining factors of each term in the parenthesis. If the polynomial cannot be factored, write the GCF as 1 and rewrite the polynomial inside the parenthesis.

15y3 + 20y – 10 =

9)A golf ball is hit upward at a speed of 40m/s. The expression -5t2 + 40t gives the approximate height of the ball after t seconds. Factor this expression.

10)Factor out the common binomial factor in each expression. Do not put spaces in your answer.

4d(d + 2) + 9(d + 2)

PLEASE HEEELPPPPP!!!!
thank you 🙂

ssadmin answers:

5b +9b^3 = 9b^3 +5b = b(9b² +5 )

-18y^3 -7y² = y²(-18y -7 )

(2×2+4x) = 2x² +4x = 2x(x +2 )=2(x+2)(x)

4s(s+6)-5(s+6) = 4s² +24s -5s -30 = 4s² +19s -30 =(s+6)(4s-5)

6b^3 +8b² +9b +12 = (3b+4)(2b²+3)

15x² -10x^3 +8x -12 = -10x^3 +15x² +8x -12 = (-2x+3)(x+.8944274)(5x-4.472137)

x² +5x = x(x +5 )=(x+5)(x)

15y^3 +20y -10 = 5(3y^3 +4y -2 ) = 5(y-.4372865)(3y²+1.31186y+4.573658)

-5t² +40t = 5t(-t +8 )=-5(t-8)(t)

4d(d+2)+9(d+2) = 4d² +8d +9d +18 = 4d² +17d +18 =(4d+9)(d+2)

Helen asks…

Wow, isn't solar power really unimpressive ?

Hi Folks,

I am all for natural energy, so fitted a few solar panels to the boat roof.

So there are 576 little bi-silicon discs doing their utmust on a bright sunny day.

I can power up a little calculator, a 2 inch plastic fan, one LED, and a plastic bobbin with light thread on that can just about lift up a sheet of toilet roll.

It is pathetic.

I have calculated that I would need to cover the whole 60ft X 7ft roof, and given maximum sunbeams, it might put a decent light on, but then, I wouldn't be needing the light I suppose.

These things are not cheap, either.

Any notions ?

Bob

ssadmin answers:

Well, it sounds like you have not set the solar cells up properly. The sun creates a tremendous amount of power that is incident on the earth, about 1000 Watts per square meter. A reasonable solar cell should be able to convert about 10% of that into power, giving you about 100 W/m^2 or a 10cm by 10cm cell should give you 1 W (that only counts the active area of the cell). By contrast, a 9V battery, run in a way that would drain it in 4 hours would provide about the same power (1 W). Of course, no one uses up a battery that quickly, so a more realistic power from a battery is about 0.05 W. That means the 100 cm^2 solar cell should be able to power quite a bit more than a 9V battery. Therefore, it really sounds like you may have hooked up your system wrong.

The voltage that you get out of a solar cell is pretty small. If you wired them up in parallel, your output voltage would be small as well. And if you hooked them up in series, your output current might not be big enough. And if you hooked them up reversed… Well… Then it wouldn't work very well at all. I don't know how you hooked them up or how much surface area you have, or how you are trying to apply the electricity to your devices, or even how much you know about all this. But if you can't run a calculator on something that is bigger than the typical solar cell on a hand-held calculator, it sounds like you must have done something wrong. And given that you are trying to run a fan (often times these are AC devices that need 120 V), a LED (these are DC devices that need very little voltage but MUST be setup in the correct circuit and receive the correct current and voltage), and a calculator (these often run on batteries with out any external connections), it sounds like you may not realize what each device needs or what you are giving it.

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