Your Questions About Solar Powered Fan

Ruth asks…

Looking into solar power (panels and such) but have a few questions..?

I've been interested in this for quite awhile, and have a few questions I've been having trouble finding an answer for..

How many panels would I need to have power for a small house with 1 or 2 people living in it?
The only thing electrical that would really be in use is an average size television, phone charger, radio, laptop, microwave, lights, possibly an air conditioner (if not, fans.) all lights would be high efficiency as well everything else.
I've also been looking into wind power and hydro power as well.

Give me lots of information, I appreciate it!!!

P.S. this would be a SMALL home, 1 bedroom, one bath and very open and lower ceilings. and plenty of windows for light to shine in.
and a cost estimate? (for new or used equipment)

ssadmin answers:

It sounds like a 2 or 3 kW system may be enough to power all of your needs. I wouldn't be able to give you an accurate guess unless I had your electricity information.

Since this is a small solar installation, I think the installed cost would be close to $7.00 per watt or depending on the complexity of the roof/electrical work. For a 2 kW system, that means $14,000, or, for a 3 kW system, that means $21,000.

Depending on where you live, there may be a state or municipal rebate which would pay for some of the upfront cost. You also would likely qualify for the 30% federal tax credit.

Below I linked to a page that shows residential incentives for Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island in case that's where you are.

Most installers offer a complimentary evaluation and a free estimate. I would contact someone in your local area to do the analysis for you.

John asks…

how to design an experiment?

For my Physics assignment,i want to design a experiment about either wind or solar power .It's my first time to design an experiment by myself.I have no idea.For wind power,i think i can use a fan as a resource,but i have no idea how to design the next steps.

help me,plz!

ssadmin answers:

OK.For Wind power…you need a vacuum ‘blower'- most cylindrical vac cleaners allow you to connect them in reverse. You also need a variac- a mains device to control the current (power output) of your wind source. To measure the power generated by the blower you need a small dc motor connected to a micro/milli ammeter or sophisticated data logging device connected via say a usb interface to your PC with suitable data capture/handling software. Connect a ‘propellor' to the spindle of your motor. (this can be cut from thin plastic to a variety of desired profiles). Now the difficult bit..you have to calibrate the pressure of the air from the blower against known variac settings..do this by connecting the blower to a mercury manometer (or bourdon gauge) and measure the overpressure in mmHg/kN/m^2 (this is nearly proportional to the air speed)..nearly done!..Now expt1..vary the wind pressure and measure your current on the ammeter or computer..plot a graph of wind pressure (velocity) against power(current output from motor). Expt2 (qualitative!)..keeping wind pressure constant.. Try different shapes of plastic propellors or turbines to find the most efficient shape. Use a bar graph for these results. Finally(!) write a conclusion based on the mathematical relationship between wind velocity and power output, mentioning that in a scaled up prototype, variation in wind speed and direction would cause the results to deviate from optimum and also state which propellor/turbine/vane is the most efficient design. Good luck!

Sandy asks…

how to design an experiment?

For my Physics assignment,i want to design a experiment about either wind or solar power .It's my first time to design an experiment by myself.I have no idea.For wind power,i think i can use a fan as a resource,but i have no idea how to design the next steps.

help me,plz!

ssadmin answers:

Do wind power

Use the fan you have to make a wind and then make a fan to spin in the wind, attach it via a rubber band to a dynamo and see what voltage it produces.

You can then experiment with different numbers of blades, blade angles and even direction of wind flow to see the result on voltage.

Have fun !

Helen asks…

Can you use a generator indoors?

I have just bought a small 850watt generator and I wanted to use it inside my solar powered shed to produce power for when my battery banks are low.

I have a small cupboard in my shed which I store my battery bank in and I have a 4inch hole in the wall to vent the gases given off by the battery.the fan for the 4inch hole vents 23litres of air per Second,so could I put my generator in the cupboard and the fumes would be vented would this work

ssadmin answers:

Any internal combustion engine inside a building needs three things. 1. A source of fresh air for combustion. 2, The exhaust vented to the outside by way of a pipe, not just dumped into the shed and pushed out by the vent fan. And 3. Enough airspace or insulation to protect the building and it contents, including a cupboard, from the heat of that engine. Those battery gasses you talk about are also flammable/explosive. Your plan will likely result in asphyxiation, a fire, or both.

Chris asks…

Can you use a generator indoors?

I have just bought a small 850watt generator and I wanted to use it inside my solar powered shed to produce power for when my battery banks are low.

I have a small cupboard in my shed which I store my battery bank in and I have a 4inch hole in the wall to vent the gases given off by the battery.the fan for the 4inch hole vents 23litres of air per Second,so could I put my generator in the cupboard and the fumes would be vented would this work

ssadmin answers:

It is not worth the risk.

Most gereators appear to work outdoors, e.g. Street markets, so why not have the running generator otsid and bring the power cable through the hole in the shed. Obviously you can move the generator inside when it is not working.

Exhaust fumes used to be ‘favourite' way of committing suicide.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Solar Panel

If you enjoyed this post, please consider to leave a comment or subscribe to the feed and get future articles delivered to your feed reader.

Comments are closed.